The Fox in the Dandelion Sea (III)

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Summary

The Hunter of fruitless hunts was awoken by a commotion outside. Who is at his door? The story of the Hunter and the Fox continues. The Fox in the Dandelion Sea, Part 3.

Book Content

Having failed to catch the white fox, I went to sleep with only tasteless boiled carrots in my stomach. If not for what happened next, I would have forgotten about the fox by now.

I awoke with a start to strange noises coming from outside my door.

“Could it be boars that have come to eat my carrots?”

I hopped out of bed and opened my door. To my surprise, there stood a tiny little white fox. Its fur was so white that it glowed in the dark, not unlike the way the sunlight sparkles on the water after filtering through the leaves.

“It must be that fox from earlier today!” I thought to myself, and then I saw those eyes that looked like gemstones in pools of water. The way the looked at me felt as though they were looking from the bottom of my heart.

My eyes still felt tired as I walked over to the fox, empty-handed. This time it stayed still and waited for me in silence. The closer I drew to the fox, the bigger it looked. By the time I stood before it, it had magically morphed into a human.

She was a tall and slender woman, with a swan-like neck and pearly skin. Her eyes sparkled like gemstone fragments in pools of  water, and at night they seemed to shine like rays of sunlight that reach the water’s surface after being filtered through the leaves.

“What a beauty. She looks just like the girl I fell in love with all those years ago, though I can’t recall her name. But those eyes tell me that it must be her.” I thought.

“This can’t be. This must be a magic trick.”

But the strangest thing was that I somehow knew in that instant that foxes could use magic. I maintain that one will believe anything after seeing those eyes. For all the fox’s magic tricks, even her ability to morph into a human, nothing amazed me quite as much as those bejeweled lakes that were eyes. For a while, we stood silently in the dead of night.

At last, she spoke. Though it was not in the common language, I could somehow understand her. It must have been another of her tricks.
“I would have died by the lake if you had not come in my hour of need.” She paused and continued:
“Although to die by the bejeweled lake is not necessarily a bad thing,”
“We foxes are grateful beings, so you must let me return the favor.”

She bowed to me, and her silky long black hair flowed down her shoulders like streams.

icon-image

Summary

The Hunter of fruitless hunts was awoken by a commotion outside. Who is at his door? The story of the Hunter and the Fox continues. The Fox in the Dandelion Sea, Part 3.

Book Content

Having failed to catch the white fox, I went to sleep with only tasteless boiled carrots in my stomach. If not for what happened next, I would have forgotten about the fox by now.

I awoke with a start to strange noises coming from outside my door.

“Could it be boars that have come to eat my carrots?”

I hopped out of bed and opened my door. To my surprise, there stood a tiny little white fox. Its fur was so white that it glowed in the dark, not unlike the way the sunlight sparkles on the water after filtering through the leaves.

“It must be that fox from earlier today!” I thought to myself, and then I saw those eyes that looked like gemstones in the water, gazing at me as if from the depths of my heart.

My eyes still felt tired as I walked over to the fox, empty-handed. This time it stayed still and waited for me in silence. The closer I drew to the fox, the bigger it looked. By the time I stood before it, it had magically morphed into a human.

She was a tall and slender woman, with a swan-like neck and pearly skin. Her eyes sparkled like gemstone fragments in pools of  water, and at night they seemed to shine like rays of sunlight that reach the water’s surface after being filtered through the leaves.

“What a beauty. She looks just like the girl I fell in love with all those years ago, though I can’t recall her name. But those eyes tell me that it must be her.” I thought.

“This can’t be. This must be a magic trick.”

But the strangest thing was that I somehow knew in that instant that foxes could use magic. You’d believe anything after you’d seen those eyes. For all the fox’s magic tricks, even her ability to morph into a human, nothing amazed me quite as much as those bejeweled lakes that were eyes. For a while, we stood silently in the dead of night.

At last, she spoke. Though it was not in the common language, I could somehow understand her. It must have been another of her tricks.
“I would have died by the lake if you had not come in my hour of need.” She paused and continued:
“Although to die by the bejeweled lake is not necessarily a bad thing,”
“We foxes are grateful beings, so you must let me return the favor.”

She bowed to me, and her silky long black hair flowed down her shoulders like streams.