Hilichurl Ballad Selection (II)

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Summary

Are wine and poetry a part of the hilichurl lifestyle? Do they have pure and devout desires? Expert on the Hilichurls, Jacob Musk, is here to answer!

Book Content

The fourth song:

Celi upa celi
Sada shato lata
Kuzi unu ya zido
Unu dada

A song sung by Samachurls. Judging by the reaction of the chief, the song seems to bear a special philosophical meaning for the Hilichurls. It may appear ridiculous in the mainstream academic circles, and I have no intention of casting doubt upon well-established views, but I feel obliged to say that the question of whether philosophical discourse truly exists among the Hilichurls is one that still fascinates me to this day, and may be deserving of further study.

The fifth song:

Nini movo muhe yoyo
Nini movo mimi tomo
Lata movo mosi yoyo
Celi movo celi yoyo

Much like the people of Mondstadt, the wind-worshiping Hilichurl tribes often drink to excess and sing endless songs of praise to the Anemo Archon. This is a Hilichurl ode that is often heard when they are inebriated.

The sixth song:

Unu, unu
Yaya ika kundala!
Unu, unu
Mita dada ya dala?
Unu, unu
Kuzi mita dada ye
Mita dada-a-mimi

A pious ode that is only sung by Hilichurls during sacrifices. When performing this ode, the Hilichurls often add percussion by beating the backsides of the weakest tribe members with planks, creating rhythmic ringing sounds. It must be quite painful.

The seventh song:

Mimi movo
Mimi sada
Mimi domu
Domu upa
Gusha dada

It appears that many Hilichurl tribes share a tradition of exchanging songs around bonfires in the moonlight. This song is one such bonfire ballad sung by the chief at the end of the night. At the end of the song, the chief shouts “nunu” three times, which presumably carries the meaning of “sleep.”

icon-image

Summary

Are wine and poetry a part of the hilichurl lifestyle? Do they have pure and devout desires? Expert on the hilichurls, Jacob Musk, is here to answer!

Book Content

The fourth song:

Celi upa celi
Sada shato lata
Kuzi unu ya zido
Unu dada

A song sung by Samachurls. Judging by the reaction of the chief, the song seems to bear a special philosophical meaning for the Hilichurls. It may appear ridiculous in the mainstream academic circles, and I have no intention of casting doubt upon well-established views, but I feel obliged to say that the question of whether philosophical discourse truly exists among the Hilichurls is one that still fascinates me to this day, and may be deserving of further study.

The fifth song:

Nini movo muhe yoyo
Nini movo mimi tomo
Lata movo mosi yoyo
Celi movo celi yoyo

Much like the people of Mondstadt, the wind-worshiping Hilichurl tribes often drink to excess and sing endless songs of praise to the Anemo Archon. This is a Hilichurl ode that is often heard when they are inebriated.

The sixth song:

Unu, unu
Yaya ika kundala!
Unu, unu
Mita dada ya dala?
Unu, unu
Kuzi mita dada ye
Mita dada-a-mimi

A pious ode that is only sung by Hilichurls during sacrifices. When performing this ode, the Hilichurls often add percussion by beating the backsides of the weakest tribe members with planks, creating rhythmic ringing sounds. It must be quite painful.

The seventh song:

Mimi movo
Mimi sada
Mimi domu
Domu upa
Gusha dada

It appears that many Hilichurl tribes share a tradition of exchanging songs around bonfires in the moonlight. This song is one such bonfire ballad sung by the chief at the end of the night. At the end of the song, the chief shouts “nunu” three times, which presumably carries the meaning of “sleep.”